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Districts of Brussels: European Quarter of Brussels, Laeken, Location of European Union Institutions, Brussels and the European Union Books LLC

Districts of Brussels: European Quarter of Brussels, Laeken, Location of European Union Institutions, Brussels and the European Union

Books LLC

Published August 17th 2011
ISBN : 9781158072989
Paperback
44 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 42. Chapters: European quarter of Brussels, Laeken, Location of European Union institutions, Brussels and the European Union, Espace L opold, Berlaymont building, R sidence Palace, Rue de la Loi, Convent Van Maerlant, Triangle building, Esplanade of the European Parliament, Chapel of the Resurrection, Brussels, Place du Luxembourg, Justus Lipsius building, Marollen, Madou Plaza Tower, Jean Rey Square, Schuman station, Brussels-Luxembourg railway station, Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Rue Belliard, Charlemagne building, Lex building, Leopold Quarter, Schuman roundabout, Neder-over-Heembeek, Delors building, Northern Quarter, Breydel building, Haren, Belgium, Leopold Park, Statue of Europe, Jardin du Maelbeek, La Roue. Excerpt: The governing institutions of the European Union (EU) are not concentrated in a single capital city- they are instead spread across three cities (Brussels, Luxembourg, and Strasbourg) with other EU agencies and bodies based further away. However, Brussels has become the primary seat, with each major institution and now the European Council being based wholly or in part there. The seats have been a matter of political dispute since the states first failed to reach an agreement at the establishment of the European Coal and Steel Community in 1952. However, a final agreement between member states was reached in 1992, and later attached to the Treaty of Amsterdam. Despite this, the seat of the European Parliament remains controversial. The work of Parliament is divided between all three major cities, which is seen as a problem due to the large number of MEPs, staff, and documents which need to be moved. As the locations of the major seats have been enshrined in the treaties of the European Union, Parliament has no right to decide its own seat, unlike other national parliaments. Locating new bodies...