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Shurangama Sutra Unknown Author 977

Shurangama Sutra

Unknown Author 977

Published October 1st 1992
ISBN : 9780917512414
Paperback
1500 pages
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 About the Book 

Spoken by Shakyamuni Buddha, the Shurangama Sutra is one of the three major sutras of the Chinese Mahayana Buddhist tradition. The Buddha explains that ultimate truth is empty yet contains all existence. He gives instruction on how living beings canMoreSpoken by Shakyamuni Buddha, the Shurangama Sutra is one of the three major sutras of the Chinese Mahayana Buddhist tradition. The Buddha explains that ultimate truth is empty yet contains all existence. He gives instruction on how living beings can return to this source, that is, how to realize enlightenment. This set contains seven volumes.Volume 1 - In dialogue with his cousin Ananda, the Buddha shows that the conscious mind is not the true or ultimate mind.Volume 2 - The Buddha shows that our sense awareness (capacity to see, hear, smell, taste, touch and be aware) is a function of our true mind. But that this awareness has become distorted and thus we have covered over our true nature.Volume 3 - The Buddha attempts to reveal the true mind.Volume 4 - The Buddha shows that the source of distortion and ignorance lies in the six sense organs, the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body and mind.Volume 5 - Twenty-five sages in the Buddhas assembly explain which methods they used to escape the false mind and return to the true mind. Kuan Yin Bodhisatva used the method of hearing to listen to the self-nature.Volume 6 - The Buddha explains that living beings must practice morality, Samadhi and wisdom in order to truly understand the self-nature. The Buddha also explains the Shurangama Mantra, the longest mantra in the world.Volume 7 - The Buddha explains in detail the successive stages a cultivator will experience as he progresses on this path toward enlightenment.(The final volume of this sutra is sold separately. It explains how to recognize the deviant mental states that may arise as a practitioner progresses on the path to enlightenment.)